Statistical Ecology

Fall Term 2001

Room TBA
Instructor: Mark Boyce, Telephone: (780) 492-0081 Email: Mark.Boyce@ualberta.ca
For more information please contact Mark Boyce.

Introduction to GPS and GIS in Field Ecology

Dates & Times: TBA
Offered: Winter Term 2002

Instructor: Colleen Cassidy St. Clair, Telephone: (780) 492-9685 or email: cstclair@ualberta.ca
or Evelyn Merrill, Telephone: (780) 492-2842 or email: emerrill@ualberta.ca

Course content:

  • Biological applications of GPS (Global Positioning System) technology
  • Fundamentals of GPS operation and limitations
  • Project planning, implementation and processing
  • GPS navigation
  • Local GPS equipment availability
  • How GPS data can be used in a GIS (Geographic Information System)

Course format: 10 hr lecture on Saturdays including demonstration components, 10 hours of lab consisting of an independent assignment in the intervening and following two weeks.

Bayesian Statistics for Ecologists

WILL NOT BE OFFERED IN 2001-2002

Room:

Instructor:

This module is intended to provide students with an introduction to Bayesian Statistical Philosophy and Methodology. Students should gain a general understanding of what Bayesian Statistics are and how to conduct simple data analysis using Bayesian methods. Students will analyze their own or hypothetical data sets. Examples will be based on ecological topics.

Topics:
  • history and philosophy of Bayesian Statistics,
  • conditional and probability and derivation of Bayes Theorem,
  • discrete probability examples and comparisions to traditional methods,
  • continuous probability,
  • priors and non-informative priors, potential problems with priors,
  • introduction to Bayesian software,
  • implementation of software for data analysis,
  • presentation and discussion of student projects.

Note: Students taking this course should have a general understanding of basic statistical methods and probability. Grading will be based on the analysis and presentation of data.

Course format: We will meet for four two-hour sessions, plus one session where students present and discuss the analysis of their data.